Survey Finds Nearly 70% of Men Currently in MBA Programs Believe Sexism Will Prevent Them from Getting C-suite Positions

SEATTLE, WA – Intelligent.com, a trusted resource for online degree rankings and higher education planning, has published a recent survey report to examine gender diversity and sexism in the workplace. Researchers surveyed 1,000 current MBA candidates in August, and the study highlights key points about the underrepresentation of women in C-suite positions. 

 Data shows that 69% of men think they will not get selected for executive-level management jobs because of sexism. Only 51% of women believe sexism will prevent them from getting C-level roles. Forty-nine percent of men also say sexism makes it challenging to advance in their careers, compared to 41% of women. 

According to the report, women are still outnumbered in C-suite positions, yet most male survey respondents believe it’s because men are more qualified for these roles. Sixty-five percent of male respondents say men are more likely to have the necessary leadership skills, and 55% say they have more work experience. In contrast, 47% of women say more men hold executive-level positions because of sexism. However, 32% say men are more likely to have the necessary qualifications. 

“As we celebrate American Business Women’s Day on September 22, it’s also necessary to encourage conversations around gender equality and explore ways to improve diversity in the workplace,” says Dr. Deb Geller, educational and hiring consultant. “This study shows that there is a disconnect when almost 70% of men think sexism will prevent them from getting executive roles, but only 21% of women hold C-suite jobs in this country.”  

The survey also indicates that White men are more likely to believe that sexism will hinder their career growth. Seventy-four percent of White male MBA candidates say that sexism will keep them from getting C-suite jobs. Conversely, only 50% of Asian, 48% of Black, and 30% of Hispanic/Latino male MBA candidates have the same opinion. Although most male respondents see sexism as a career barrier, 85% also think it is important that women are equally represented in C-level positions.

Intelligent.com commissioned this study to increase awareness about issues surrounding gender equity in the workplace. The survey was conducted via Pollfish, the online survey platform, on August 23, 2021 and distributed to individuals who are currently enrolled in an MBA program. Survey respondents were selected based on a screening question. To access the complete report, please visit here 

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